Labour Market Bulletin - Ontario: April 2017

This Labour Market Bulletin provides an analysis of Labour Force Survey results for the province of Ontario, including the regions of Hamilton–Niagara Peninsula, Kingston–Pembroke, Kitchener–Waterloo–Barrie, London, Muskoka–Kawarthas, Northeast, Northwest, Ottawa, Stratford–Bruce Peninsula, Toronto and Windsor–Sarnia.

Overview

Labour Force Trends – Ontario employment holds steady in April

  • The Ontario employment figure decreased slightly by 1,600 in April
  • Losses in full-time employment (-13,800) more than offset gains in part-time employment (+12,300)
  • The unemployment rate declined from 6.4% in March to 5.8% in April

In April, Ontario employment decreased slightly by 1,600. April saw part-time employment gains of 12,300 which were more than offset by losses in full-time employment (-13,800). Compared to March, the provincial unemployment rate dropped by 0.6 percentage points in April as unemployment decreased by 45,200. As the labour force shrank by 46,800, the participation rate declined from 64.9% in March to 64.5% in April, which could indicate that a number of unemployed job-seekers opted to leave the labour force.

In Canada, employment increased by a lacklustre 3,200 in April. While this was the fifth consecutive month of gains, it fell short of the expected employment increase of 10,000.1 The gain came solely from an increase in part-time employment (+34,300) which more than offset a full-time employment decline (-31,200). National employment growth in April was driven primarily by gains in British Columbia, while Quebec and Saskatchewan experienced declines. The national unemployment rate declined from 6.7% in March to 6.5% in April. As in Ontario, national labour force (-45,500) and unemployment (-48,700) figures declined by similar amounts which implies a significant number of individuals exiting the labour force.

Additionally, there was concern over a very weak 0.7% year-over-year gain in average hourly wages. The Bank of Canada has used this to support a looser monetary policy stance as it implies that there is a fair amount of slack remaining in the economy. However, despite some of these more negative tones, strong business confidence as measured by the Ivey PMI, bodes well for the Canadian economy going forward.2

In the United States, total non-farm payroll employment increased by 211,000 in April, beating the expected 185,000 and recovering from a weak 79,000 employment increase in March.3 Employment increased in leisure and hospitality, health care and social assistance, and financial activities. The unemployment rate fell from 4.5% in March to 4.4% in April.4 Following a weak first quarter for the U.S. economy, where GDP growth was only 0.7%, this jobs report will provide some confidence to the U.S. Federal Reserve's assertion that the weak first quarter result was only transitory and that another interest-rate hike is expected in June. This continues to suggest a robust labour market and an optimistic economic outlook.5

Between April 2016 and April 2017, employment in Ontario increased by 86,600 (+1.2%), with the majority of the gains coming from full-time employment. On a year-over-year basis, the unemployment rate dropped by 1.1 percentage points to 5.8%, due to a decrease of 82,500 in unemployment. However, the participation rate also dropped by 0.8 percentage points to 64.5%, as the growth in population (+1.3%) continued to outpace the increase in the labour force (+0.1%).

The unemployment rate for youth aged 15 to 24 in Ontario declined by 2.6 percentage points to 12.2% in April but remained higher than the national youth unemployment rate of 11.7%. Ontario's youth participation rate declined by 0.7 percentage points and the employment rate remained unchanged. The youth labour force (-30,000) and unemployment (-31,000) both declined by similar amounts which again implies an exodus from the labour force. This could also imply that the driver of unemployed job-seekers leaving the labour force, provincially for all ages, was the youth segment.

Ontario Monthly Labour Force Statistics
Seasonally adjusted monthly data April 2017 March 2017 April 2016 Monthly variation Yearly variation
Number % Number %
Population 15 + ('000) 11,642.4 11,628.4 11,487.5 14.0 0.1 154.9 1.3
Labour force ('000) 7,504.4 7,551.2 7,500.3 -46.8 -0.6 4.1 0.1
Employment ('000) 7,067.0 7,068.6 6,980.4 -1.6 0.0 86.6 1.2
Full-time ('000) 5,746.1 5,759.9 5,649.3 -13.8 -0.2 96.8 1.7
Part-time ('000) 1,321.0 1,308.7 1,331.2 12.3 0.9 -10.2 -0.8
Unemployment ('000) 437.4 482.6 519.9 -45.2 -9.4 -82.5 -15.9
Unemployment rate (%) 5.8 6.4 6.9 -0.6 - -1.1 -
Participation rate (%) 64.5 64.9 65.3 -0.4 - -0.8 -
Employment rate (%) 60.7 60.8 60.8 -0.1 - -0.1 -

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey – CANSIM Table 282-0087

Ontario Monthly Employment and Unemployment Rate
Monthly employment and unemployment rate. The data table for this graph is located below
Show data table: Ontario monthly employment and unemployment rate
Ontario monthly employment and unemployment rate
Unemployment rate (%) Employment ('000)
April 2015 6.7 6,889.4
May 2015 6.5 6,923.6
June 2015 6.5 6,941.5
July 2015 6.6 6,948.0
August 2015 6.8 6,947.2
September 2015 6.8 6,917.5
October 2015 6.8 6,939.9
November 2015 6.9 6,932.7
December 2015 6.7 6,962.8
January 2016 6.7 6,985.1
February 2016 6.7 6,972.3
March 2016 6.8 6,982.3
April 2016 6.9 6,980.4
May 2016 6.6 7,000.9
June 2016 6.3 7,005.7
July 2016 6.5 6,968.4
August 2016 6.7 6,983.7
September 2016 6.5 7,002.6
October 2016 6.4 7,028.1
November 2016 6.2 7,040.0
December 2016 6.4 7,046.4
January 2017 6.4 7,075.2
February 2017 6.2 7,079.8
March 2017 6.4 7,068.6
April 2017 5.8 7,067.0

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey

Ontario Monthly Unemployment Rates, by Gender and Age
Seasonally adjusted
data
April 2017
%
March 2017
%
April 2016
%
Monthly variation
(% points)
Yearly variation
(% points)
Total 5.8 6.4 6.9 -0.6 -1.1
25 years and over 4.8 5.0 5.6 -0.2 -0.8
Men - 25 years and over 4.8 4.7 5.8 0.1 -1.0
Women - 25 years and over 4.8 5.3 5.4 -0.5 -0.6
15 to 24 years 12.2 14.8 14.8 -2.6 -2.6
Men - 15 to 24 years 13.0 15.8 16.4 -2.8 -3.4
Women - 15 to 24 years 11.4 13.6 13.1 -2.2 -1.7

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey – CANSIM Table 282-0087

Employment by industry

Goods-producing sector monthly employment down, but up year-over-year

Ontario's goods-producing sector employment in April was slightly lower; the seasonally adjusted figure was down 8,300 (0.6%) since March. Sector losses were highest in construction (-6,900) and manufacturing (-4,100), tempered by gains in forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas (+3,000).

The decline in construction was likely tied to slower non-residential activity. Although building permit values in Ontario fell in February on lower residential permits,6 housing starts in March were 5.0% higher.7 Residential intentions are also still higher than a year ago. CentreCourt Developments, for example, plans to start work on the 55-storey Transit City Condos tower in Vaughan this year.8 Future commercial projects announced in April include Loblaw Companies Limited's $1.3B plan to open 30 new stores and renovate over 500 others9 and Bay Park Centre, a joint Ivanhoé Cambridge and Hines Interests LP commercial tower development in downtown Toronto.10 Several large infrastructure projects are also in the works, as the Government of Canada announced over $1.8B for four GO Transit projects in the Greater Golden Horseshoe11 and awarded contracts for restorations and repairs along the Trent-Severn Waterway totalling $330M.12 A separate $330M upgrade of the Woodward Avenue Wastewater Treatment Plant in Hamilton is also set to start in June and to employ 300 workers at its peak.13

While some manufacturing layoffs were announced,14,15 the industry signalled a more positive outlook overall in April. Canadian manufacturer optimism increased to its highest level in the last six years, according to the IHS Markit survey of purchasing managers. A strengthening energy sector, higher domestic sales, and growth in US demand stimulated domestic manufacturing output.16 Amid the positive industry news in April, engineered wood products maker Phoenix Building Components Inc. will begin production and rehire 60 employees of the previous Kent Trusses plant in Sundridge,17 building membrane manufacturer Soprema will set up a new facility in Woodstock, 18 and numerous craft breweries are opening and expanding.19,20,21,22 In Ontario's key auto sector, stronger Canadian production, domestic sales, and exports to the US buoyed manufacturers.23 Parts maker Mitsui High-tec, Inc. opened a new facility in Brantford and Titan Trailers Inc. is investing $35M to increase capacity and employment at its Courtland plant; from 200 to 300 full-time workers.24

News of employment gains in resource extraction in April was dimmed by the announcement of retroactive tariffs on Canadian lumber exports to the US of between 3 and 24%. Though there are signs the duty hike was anticipated by some producers, its employment impacts on forestry in Ontario and on wood product and pulp and paper manufacturing are yet unknown.25 Further duties on Canadian lumber exports are expected to be announced in June as part of anti-dumping measures by the US.

Year-over-year employment in the goods-producing sector grew in April, adding 86,600 (+1.2%) positions compared to 12 months earlier. Twelve-month gains within sector industries were led by construction (+19,300) and manufacturing (+11,800) and losses were highest in agriculture (-11,600).

Services-producing sector employment held steady with gains offsetting losses

Changes in services-producing industries left the sector little changed between April and March (+6,700). Gains were led by professional, scientific and technical services (+12,200), transportation and warehousing (+11,600), and educational services (+11,300). The largest losses occurred in accommodation and food services (-15,100) and information, culture, and recreation (-9,800).

Also posting employment declines, finance, insurance, real estate and leasing shed some 6,800 positions in April, among mixed industry news. Layoffs of 1,500 at the Great-West Life Assurance Company across Canada will include 430 at its London Life Insurance Company subsidiary in London over the next two years.26 On the bright side, however, health insurer League Inc. plans to expand and hire over 100 workers in Toronto27 and online heavy equipment rental service Dozr intends to hire around 50 in Kitchener.28

Since April 2016, services-producing employment added 72,500 (+1.3%). Industry gains were led by health care and social assistance (+26,900) and public administration (+24, 800) and losses were only marked in accommodation and food services (-14,300) and information, culture and recreation (-8,000).

Ontario Monthly Labour Force Statistics, by Industry
Seasonally adjusted data ('000) April 2017 March 2017 April 2016 Monthly variation Yearly variation
Number % Number %
Total employed, all industries 7,067.0 7,068.6 6,980.4 -1.6 0.0 86.6 1.2
Goods-producing sector 1,416.1 1,424.4 1,402.1 -8.3 -0.6 14.0 1.0
Agriculture 68.5 69.7 80.1 -1.2 -1.7 -11.6 -14.5
Forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying,
oil and gas
36.3 33.3 39.4 3.0 9.0 -3.1 -7.9
Utilities 47.6 46.8 49.9 0.8 1.7 -2.3 -4.6
Construction 502.0 508.9 482.7 -6.9 -1.4 19.3 4.0
Manufacturing 761.7 765.8 749.9 -4.1 -0.5 11.8 1.6
Services-producing sector 5,650.9 5,644.2 5,578.4 6.7 0.1 72.5 1.3
Trade 1,035.0 1,035.0 1,041.7 0.0 0.0 -6.7 -0.6
Transportation and warehousing 336.0 324.4 332.1 11.6 3.6 3.9 1.2
Finance, insurance, real estate
and leasing
565.7 572.5 554.5 -6.8 -1.2 11.2 2.0
Professional, scientific
and technical services
616.7 604.5 598.6 12.2 2.0 18.1 3.0
Business, building
and other support services
333.7 331.7 323.4 2.0 0.6 10.3 3.2
Educational services 503.1 491.8 501.9 11.3 2.3 1.2 0.2
Health care and social assistance 861.7 865.7 834.8 -4.0 -0.5 26.9 3.2
Information, culture and recreation 300.3 310.1 308.3 -9.8 -3.2 -8.0 -2.6
Accommodation and food services 444.6 459.7 458.9 -15.1 -3.3 -14.3 -3.1
Other services 277.7 275.0 272.5 2.7 1.0 5.2 1.9
Public administration 376.5 373.6 351.7 2.9 0.8 24.8 7.1

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey – CANSIM Table 282-0088

Regional analysis

Employment in Toronto led employment growth in April 2017

The Toronto economic region produced the highest gains in employment between April 2016 and April 2017, boasting an increase of 39,200. As a result, unemployment fell by 0.5% as advances were made in both full-time and part-time work. Positive developments came from the regional retail trade sector as several retailers opened throughout the region including a Whole Foods location in the Leaside community,29 the first Canadian location for apparel and lifestyle brands retailer, Footaction, in the Eaton Centre,30 and a Sleep Country Canada store in Bolton.31 Going forward, Breitling, a Swiss watch manufacturer, will open a location,32 Samsung Electronics Canada Inc. will open a 21,000-sq.-ft. flagship store,33 and RYU Apparel, a fitness apparel brand, will open a new location,34 all over the course of the next few months. However, recent news that clothing retailer, Express Inc., with most of its locations in the Toronto economic region, is set to shutter all of its brick and mortar locations across the country by the end of the month,35 could adversely affect employment in the region.

The Hamilton–Niagara Peninsula economic region also recorded an increase in employment of 20,900 between April 2016 and April 2017. The unemployment rate dropped by half a percentage point over the period, as more people found employment in both full-time and part-time work. A small boost to the manufacturing sector came this month as Mitsui High-tec, Inc. opened a Brantford facility and hired 31 local employees. There are also plans to double this number over the next few years.36 Furthermore, the real estate and rental and leasing industry is set to increase its presence in the community as Ryder Material Handling ULC will open a new sales and service centre in Brantford in July.37 One of the four projects slated for the Government of Canada's investment in GO Transit is in Hamilton,11 supporting employment in one of the region's largest industries: construction.

The Muskoka–Kawarthas economic region also produced strong gains in employment of 16,300, a 10.7% increase over the year. Advances were made as more individuals joined the labour force, increasing the participation rate by 5.2 percentage points. Positive news in the construction industry included the Government of Canada's investment in Trent-Severn Waterway structure upgrades12

slated to start in 2018 and to be completed in 2020. Furthermore, construction is underway on a $9.3M, Hampton by Hilton hotel in Belleville,38 and the City of Pembroke has awarded the Indian River Bridge Rehabilitation contract to Willis Kerr Contracting Ltd., with the expectation that the work will be completed this summer.39

The Ottawa economic region also profited in employment by 11,000, and decreased the unemployment rate by 1.6 percentage points over the term. Most of the increase was in part-time work which may be driven by trends in retail trade employment across the province. As such, David's Tea Inc. opened a location in Cornwall,40 a new Sobeys opened in Orléans,41 and news that Ollie Quinn, a UK-based eyewear retailer, will open a boutique in Ottawa on Richmond Road42 could help push regional industry growth forward.

Employment also increased in the London, Kingston–Pembroke, Northwest, and Stratford–Bruce Peninsula economic regions.

Employment decreased in three economic regions over the term

The largest drop in employment (-5,900) occurred in the Northeast economic region between April 2016 and April 2017. Losses in employment were represented in both full-time and part-time work. However the unemployment rate dipped by 0.6 percentage points as more people left the labour force. As ongoing changes in the finance and insurance industry continue, RBC will close its Dubreuilville branch in October,43 not helping the region's employment scenario. Going forward, the Northeast may see some positive growth in the manufacturing sector as Phoenix Building Components Inc., an engineered wood building products manufacturer, purchased the former Kent Trusses Ltd. plant,17 and Crosscut Distillery in Greater Sudbury will open by the end of the summer, complete with a tasting room and retail area.44 Furthermore, the construction industry might get a boost in the region as the Municipality of Central Manitoulin awarded an $858K tender to Sheppard Custom Building to construct a fire hall in Mindemoya, set to be complete by the fall.45

Windsor–Sarnia also posted an employment decrease of -3,600, a 1.2% drop between April 2016 and April 2017. However, losses were entirely in part-time work. A decrease in the unemployment rate of 0.6 percentage points was reported, most likely due to the dip in the labour force and participation rate over the same period. Several upcoming construction projects,46,47,48 and developments in the manufacturing sector49,20 could help bolster employment in the economic region in future months.

The Kitchener–Waterloo–Barrie economic region also saw an employment loss of -1,800 between April 2016 and April 2017. The losses were seen entirely in part-time work as they more than offset gains in full-time work. Yet, the unemployment rate dropped by 0.3 percentage points, most likely as folks left the labour force. Damaging news in the manufacturing sector came from a layoff at Decast Ltd.14 However, job creation in the region's largest industry will likely pick up going forward as a new Frito Lay Canada warehouse in Cambridge50 is completed and Linear Transfer Automation Inc. expands in Barrie.51

Ontario Monthly Labour Force Statistics, by Economic Region
3-month moving averages
seasonally unadjusted data
Employment Unemployment rate
April 2017
('000)
April 2016
('000)
Yearly variation
(%)
April 2017
(%)
April 2016
(%)
Yearly variation
(% points)
Ontario 6,982.8 6,890.3 1.3 6.3 7.0 -0.7
Economic regions
Ottawa 692.4 681.4 1.6 5.7 7.3 -1.6
Kingston--Pembroke 207.5 200.5 3.5 5.8 7.7 -1.9
Muskoka--Kawarthas 179.0 162.7 10.0 6.3 5.7 0.6
Toronto 3,368.7 3,329.5 1.2 6.7 7.2 -0.5
Kitchener--Waterloo--Barrie 705.6 707.4 -0.3 5.7 6.0 -0.3
Hamilton--Niagara Peninsula 730.7 709.8 2.9 5.9 6.5 -0.6
London 334.2 326.8 2.3 5.4 6.9 -1.5
Windsor--Sarnia 288.5 292.1 -1.2 6.7 7.3 -0.6
Stratford--Bruce Peninsula 140.6 140.0 0.4 6.1 6.2 -0.1
Northeast 235.9 241.8 -2.4 7.9 8.5 -0.6
Northwest 99.6 98.3 1.3 6.3 8.1 -1.8

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey – CANSIM Table 282-0122

Note

In preparing this document, the authors have taken care to provide clients with labour market information that is timely and accurate at the time of publication. Since labour market conditions are dynamic, some of the information presented here may have changed since this document was published. Users are encouraged to also refer to other sources for additional information on the local economy and labour market. Information contained in this document does not necessarily reflect official policies of Employment and Social Development Canada.

Prepared by: Labour Market Information (LMI) Division, Ontario
For further information, please contact the LMI team.
For information on the Labour Force Survey, please visit the Statistics Canada website.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Trading Economics. (2017, May 5). Canada Employment Change. Trading Economics. Retrieved from: http://www.tradingeconomics.com/canada/employment-change

Return to Footnote 1

Footnote 2

Trading Economics. (2017, May 5). Canadian Business Confidence. Trading Economics. Retrieved from: http://www.tradingeconomics.com/canada/business-confidence

Return to Footnote 2

Footnote 3

Trading Economics. (2017, May 5). U.S. Non-Farm Payrolls. Trading Economics. Retrieved from: http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-states/non-farm-payrolls

Return to Footnote 3

Footnote 4

Trading Economics. (2017, May 5). United States Unemployment Rate. Trading Economics. Retrieved from: http://www.tradingeconomics.com/united-states/unemployment-rate

Return to Footnote 4

Footnote 5

Samson, A. (2017, May 5). US jobs growth bounces back in April. Financial Times. Retrieved from: https://www.ft.com/content/1331dcfe-3189-11e7-9555-23ef563ecf9a

Return to Footnote 5

Footnote 6

Statistics Canada. (2017, May 4). CANSIM Table 026-0003, Building permits, values by activity sector, monthly (dollars). Statistics Canada. Retrieved from: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26?id=0260003

Return to Footnote 6

Footnote 7

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. (2017, May 4). CANSIM Table 027-0054, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, housing starts all areas. Statistics Canada. Retrieved from: http://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a26?id=0270054

Return to Footnote 7

Footnote 8

Kalinowski, T. (2017, April 12). Ambitious development aims to give Vaughan downtown credibility. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from: https://www.thestar.com/business/2017/04/12/ambitious-development-aims-to-give-vaughan-downtown-credibility.html

Return to Footnote 8

Footnote 9

The Canadian Press. (2017, April 13). Loblaw plans to open 30 new stores, upgrade others. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/loblaw-plans-to-open-30-new-stores-upgrade-others/article34695022/

Return to Footnote 9

Footnote 10

Pellegrini, C. and Bradshaw, J. (2017, April 12). CIBC to move 15,000 staff to new downtown Toronto headquarters. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/cibc-to-move-into-new-two-tower-development-in-downtown-toronto/article34680498/

Return to Footnote 10

Footnote 11

Infrastructure Canada. (2017, April 3). Governments of Canada and Ontario support public transit infrastructure across Ontario. Government of Canada Newsroom. Retrieved from: https://www.canada.ca/en/office-infrastructure/news/2017/04/governments_of_canadaandontariosupportpublictransitinfrastructur.html

Return to Footnote 11

Footnote 12

Public Service and Procurement Canada. (2017, April 25). Significant Milestone reached as Government of Canada Awards $330 Million in Construction Contracts for Trent-Severn Waterway Infrastructure. Government of Canada Newsroom. Retrieved from: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-services-procurement/news/2017/04/significant_milestonereachedasgovernmentofcanadaawards330million.html

Return to Footnote 12

Footnote 13

Werner, K. (2017, April 3). Hamilton east residents prepare for $330-million construction project at Woodward Avenue treatment plan. Hamilton News. Retrieved from: https://www.hamiltonnews.com/news-story/7221139-hamilton-east-residents-prepare-for-330-million-construction-project-at-woodward-avenue-treatment-plan/

Return to Footnote 13

Footnote 14

CTV Staff. (2017, April 12). Decast lays off 24 employees citing troubles in the U.S. CTV Barrie. Retrieved from: http://barrie.ctvnews.ca/decast-lays-off-24-employees-citing-troubles-in-the-u-s-1.3366093

Return to Footnote 14

Footnote 15

Richmond, R. (2017, April 20). General Dynamics Land System laying off salaried staff in London. London Free Press. Retrieved from: http://www.lfpress.com/2017/04/20/general-dynamics-land-system-laying-off-salaried-staff-in-london

Return to Footnote 15

Footnote 16

IHS Markit. (2017, May 1). Markit Canada Manufacturing PMI. IHS Markit. Retrieved from: http://scma.com/images/scma/News/PMI/CA_Manufacturing_ENG_1705_LITE.pdf

Return to Footnote 16

Footnote 17

Wilson. P. J. (2017, April 3). 50 to 60 people expected to be back on staff. The Nugget. Retrieved from: http://www.nugget.ca/2017/04/03/50-to-60-people-expected-to-be-back-on-staff

Return to Footnote 17

Footnote 18

Heart FM Staff. (2017, April 27). New Manufacturing Facility Comes to the Friendly City. Heart FM. Retrieved from: http://www.heartfm.ca/news/local-news/new-manufacturing-facility-comes-to-the-friendly-city/

Return to Footnote 18

Footnote 19

Alkema, J. (2017, April 5). Another craft brewery for Bayfield. The Goderich Signal Star. Retrieved from: http://www.goderichsignalstar.com/2017/04/05/another-craft-brewery-for-bayfield

Return to Footnote 19

Footnote 20

Samba. B. (2017, April 23). Seven new breweries coming to Windsor area in the near future. The Windsor Star. Retrieved from: http://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/seven-new-breweries-coming-to-windsor-area-in-the-near-future

Return to Footnote 20

Footnote 21

Ross, I. (2017, April 20). This craft brewer is hopping. Northern Ontario Business. Retrieved from: https://www.northernontariobusiness.com/regional-news/thunder-bay/this-craft-brewer-is-hopping-593085

Return to Footnote 21

Footnote 22

Ministry of Northern Development and Mines. (2017, April 21). Ontario Supporting Craft Brewery Expansion in Sault Ste. Marie. Ontario Newsroom. Retrieved from: https://news.ontario.ca/mndmf/en/2017/04/ontario-supporting-craft-brewery-expansion-in-sault-ste-marie-1.html

Return to Footnote 22

Footnote 23

DesRosiers Automotive Consultants Inc. (2017, April 30). DesRosiers Automotive Reports. Volume 31-Issue 8

DesRosiers Automotive Consultants Inc. (2017, April 15). DesRosiers Automotive Reports. Volume 31-Issue 7

Return to Footnote 23

Footnote 24

Sonnenberg, M. (2017, April 12). $35M investment will double manufacturing floor area at Titan Trailers. The Delhi News Record. Retrieved from: http://www.delhinewsrecord.com/2017/04/12/35m-investment-will-double-manufacturing-floor-area-at-titan-trailers

Return to Footnote 24

Footnote 25

McGregor, J. (2017, April 24). U.S. imposes preliminary duties up to 24% on 'subsidized' Canadian softwood lumber. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/wilbur-ross-softwood-tarrif-1.4083968

Return to Footnote 25

Footnote 26

Chant, M. (2017, April 25). London Life Losing 430 Jobs. Blackburn News. Retrieved from: http://blackburnnews.com/london/london-news/2017/04/25/london-life-losing-430-jobs/

Return to Footnote 26

Footnote 27

Onoszko, M. (2017, April 4). Ontario tech sector booms as Trudeau's innovation strategy starts taking shape. Bloomberg News via The National Post. Retrieved from: http://business.financialpost.com/fp-tech-desk/ontario-tech-sector-booms-as-trudeaus-innovation-strategy-starts-taking-shape

Return to Footnote 27

Footnote 28

Pender, T. (2017, April 8). Dozr making big push with equipment rentals. The Waterloo Region Record. Retrieved from: http://www.therecord.com/news-story/7232034-dozr-making-big-push-with-equipment-rentals/

Return to Footnote 28

Footnote 29

Bayside News. (2017, April 26). Grand opening of Whole Foods - Leaside. Bayside News. Retrieved from: http://bayview-news.com/2017/04/first-look-grand-opening-of-whole-foods-leaside.html

Return to Footnote 29

Footnote 30

CNW. (2017, April 7). Footaction Opens Flagship Store In Toronto Eaton Centre. Newswire.ca. Retrieved from: http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/footaction-opens-flagship-store-in-toronto-eaton-centre-618647493.html

Return to Footnote 30

Footnote 31

CNW. (2017, April 21). Sleep Country Continues Expanding in Ontario. Newswire.ca. Retrieved from: http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/sleep-country-continues-expanding-in-ontario-620073213.html

Return to Footnote 31

Footnote 32

Retail Insider. (2017, April 19). Breitling to Open 1st Canadian Boutique. Retail-Insider.com. Retrieved from: http://www.retail-insider.com/retail-insider/2017/4/breitling

Return to Footnote 32

Footnote 33

CNW. (2017, April 3). Samsung Canada To Transform the Retail Brand Experience. Newswire.ca. Retrieved from: http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/samsung-canada-to-transform-the-retail-brand-experience-617955393.html

Return to Footnote 33

Footnote 34

Retail Insider. (2017, April 20). RYU Apparel Continues Canadian Expansion with 3 Openings in 2017. Retail-Insider.com. Retrieved from: http://www.retail-insider.com/retail-insider/2017/4/ryu

Return to Footnote 34

Footnote 35

CBC News. (2017, May 4). U.S. fashion chain Express to shut all 17 stores in Canada. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/express-retail-canada-1.4099543

Return to Footnote 35

Footnote 36

Ruby, M. (2017, April 26). Mitsui plans to grow. Brantford Expositor. Retrieved from: http://www.brantfordexpositor.ca/2017/04/26/mitsui-plans-to-grow

Return to Footnote 36

Footnote 37

Gray, V. (2017, April 13). Ryder to make Brantford its new home. Brantnews.com. Retrieved from: https://www.brantnews.com/news-story/7242513-ryder-to-make-brantford-its-new-home/

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Footnote 38

Kleinsteuber, N. (2017, April 18). Construction on new Hampton hotel taking shape. Quintenews.com. Retrieved from: http://www.quintenews.com/2017/04/construction-new-hampton-hotel-taking-shape/145206/

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Footnote 39

Uhler, S. (2017, April 7). Indian River Bridge tender awarded. The Daily Observer. Retrieved from: http://www.thedailyobserver.ca/2017/04/07/indian-river-bridge-tender-awarded

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Footnote 40

Peters, B. (2017, April 7). DAVIDsTEA Opens at Cornwall Square. Choosecornwall.ca. Retrieved from: http://www.choosecornwall.ca/eng/news/1353/57/DAVIDsTEA-Opens-at-Cornwall-Square/

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Footnote 41

Sherwin, F. (2017, March 31). New Sobeys store opens its doors to enthusiastic customers. Orleansonline.ca. Retrieved from: http://orleansonline.ca/pages/N2017033102.htm

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Footnote 42

Retail Insider. (2017, April 5). Eyewear Retailer Ollie Quinn Launches Canadian Operations with 9 Stores. Retail-Insider.com. Retrieved from: http://www.retail-insider.com/retail-insider/2017/4/ollie-quinn

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Footnote 43

Wawa-News. (2017, April 19). Royal Bank to close Dubreuilville Branch. Wawa-News.com. Retrieved from: http://wawa-news.com/index.php/2017/04/19/royal-bank-to-close-dubreuilville-branch/

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Footnote 44

Ulrichsen, H. (2017, April 24). Vodka, gin and whiskey – oh, my! The Nickel City is getting its own distillery. Sudbury.com. Retrieved from: https://www.sudbury.com/local-news/vodka-gin-and-whiskey-oh-my-the-nickel-city-is-getting-its-own-distillery-596540

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Footnote 45

Sasvari, T. (2017, April 19). Central Manitoulin council approves bid for construction of new fire hall. The Manitoulin Expositor. Retrieved from: http://www.manitoulin.ca/2017/04/19/central-manitoulin-council-approves-bid-construction-new-fire-hall/

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Footnote 46

CBC News. (2017, March 28). $10M modernization for historic Walker Power Building. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/10m-modern-makeover-for-historic-walker-power-building-1.4044262

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Footnote 47

Schmidt, D. (2017, April 10). NatureFresh builds Leamington distribution centre. The Windsor Star. Retrieved from: http://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/naturefresh-builds-new-4m-leamington-distribution-centre

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Footnote 48

Observer Staff. (2017, March 1). Sarnia city hall notebook. The Observer. Retrieved from: http://www.theobserver.ca/2017/03/01/sarnia-city-hall-notebook

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Footnote 49

Clark, C. (2017, April). Firm expands with purchase and investment. Windsor Business. Retrieved from: http://www.windsorbusiness.net/flip-books/2017-04-01/html5/

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Footnote 50

CTV Kitchener. (2017, April 19). PepsiCo breaks ground on new warehouse in Cambridge. CTV News. Retrieved from: http://kitchener.ctvnews.ca/pepsico-breaks-ground-on-new-warehouse-in-cambridge-1.3375661

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Footnote 51

Colby, K.C. (2017, April 4). Linear Transfer Automation celebrate Barrie expansion. CTV News. Retrieved from: http://barrie.ctvnews.ca/linear-transfer-automation-celebrate-barrie-expansion-1.3354538

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