Labour Market Bulletin - Ontario: March 2016

The Quarterly Edition of the Labour Market Bulletin is a look back over the past three months, providing an analysis of quarterly Labour Force Survey results for the province of Ontario, including the regions of Hamilton—Niagara Peninsula, Kingston—Pembroke, Kitchener—Waterloo—Barrie, London, Muskoka—Kawarthas, Northeast, Northwest, Ottawa, Stratford—Bruce Peninsula, Toronto and Windsor—Sarnia.

Overview

Labour Force Trends — Employment grew for the fourth consecutive quarter in Ontario

  • Job gains were seen in both full–time (+18,900) and part–time work (+17,300)
  • The unemployment rate held steady at 6.8%
  • The unemployment rate for youth aged 15 to 24 rose from 14.1% to 14.2% in the first quarter

Employment increased by 36,200 in Ontario in the first quarter of 2016. This was the fourth consecutive quarterly gain for the province. It was also the largest quarterly increase seen in Ontario in three years. Job growth in January and March more than offset losses seen in February. Gains were fairly even between full–time and part–time work over this three–month period. Both employment and participation rates inched up after little growth over the past two quarters. For the younger workers, the unemployment rate for youth aged 15 to 24 saw a small uptick to 14.2% from the previous quarter. The employment rate for Ontario’s youth has trended downwards over the last several quarters, falling to 51.3% in the first quarter of 2016.

Across Canada, employment grew by 10,500 in the first quarter of 2016. Despite job losses in the previous two months, an unlikely surge in employment in March ended the quarter on a high note. The national unemployment rate increased to 7.2% over this three–month period. The quarterly unemployment rate has trended upwards since the end of 2014 and is now at its highest level in Canada in about three years.

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 215,000 in the United States in March 2016. This gain topped the predictions of many analysts, which hovered closer to the 205,000 mark. Job gains have averaged 209,000 between January and March 2016. The unemployment rate rose slightly to 5.0% south of the border in March 2016 and has showed little change over the past three months. Even with improving labour market conditions and strengthening business activity, Footnote1 the Federal Reserve may be hesitant to raise interest rates in the coming weeks because of ongoing risks overseas. Footnote2

Employment grew by 86,700 in Ontario between the first quarters of 2015 and 2016. All of the job gains were in full–time work, which jumped by 121,000. The unemployment rate edged down while the participation rate saw no movement over this period.

A look at labour market conditions for Ontario’s Indigenous People

In Ontario, the Indigenous population living off–reserve accounted for 2.0% of the province’s total population in March 2016. Employment among the Indigenous population fell by 5,400 (–4.4%) between the first quarters of 2015 and 2016. All of the losses were in full–time work (–8,700) while part–time employment saw modest gains (+3,400) over the past year. The unemployment rate among the Indigenous population edged down by 0.6 percentage points to 12.0% between the first quarters of 2015 and 2016. Meanwhile, the unemployment rate for the non–Indigenous population fell by 0.1 percentage point to 6.9% over this same period. Both the participation and employment rates for the Indigenous population dropped rather sharply to 57.4% and 50.6%, respectively. In contrast, both rates remained relatively unchanged for the non–Indigenous population.

In March 2016, the total population aged 15+ in Ontario was 11.5 million. The Indigenous population living off–reserve accounted for 2.0% of that, or 229,600 people. In the first quarter of 2016, employment among the Indigenous population stood at 116,100 representing a decline of –5,400 (–4.4%) from a year earlier. Full–time positions accounted for the decline (–8,700 or –9.4%), however, this was partially off–set by an increase in part–time positions (+3,400 or +11.8%). In March 2016, the unemployment rates among both the Indigenous and non–Indigenous populations edged down slightly from a year earlier to 12%, –0.6 percentage point (pp) and 6.9% (–0.1pp), respectively. The participation rate of the Indigenous population decreased to 57.4% (–5.2pp) while the non–Indigenous population remained relatively unchanged at 64.5% (0.1pp) compared to a year earlier. In March 2016, the employment rate among the Indigenous population decreased from the previous year to 50.6% (–4.1pp) while the non–Indigenous population remained relatively unchanged at 60.1% (+0.2pp).

A couple of partnerships took shape between the First Nations community and local colleges in the first quarter of 2016. In March 2016, Lambton College announced that it would collaborate with the Chippewas of Kettle and Stony Point First Nation to open a satellite location in Sarnia to promote entrepreneurship among the First Nation community. Footnote3 And in northern Ontario, Cambrian College, Resolute Forest Products, and the communities of Red Rock and Fort William First Nation are working together to train local residents. The Government of Ontario is funding an initiative that will see six local residents trained for secured jobs at Resolute. The students will complete a two–year industrial mechanical millwright apprenticeship program at Cambrian College and then start to work at one of Resolute’s operations thereafter. Footnote4

Ontario Quarterly Labour Force Statistics
Seasonally Adjusted Quarterly Data 1st Quarter 2016 4th Quarter 2015 1st Quarter 2015 Quarterly Variation Yearly Variation
Number % Number %
Population 15 + ('000) 11,466.1 11,435.4 11,338.2 30.7 0.3 127.9 1.1
Labour Force ('000) 7,489.7 7,452.8 7,405.3 36.9 0.5 84.4 1.1
Employment ('000) 6,983.1 6,946.9 6,896.4 36.2 0.5 86.7 1.3
Full-Time ('000) 5,676.5 5,657.6 5,555.5 18.9 0.3 121.0 2.2
Part-Time ('000) 1,306.6 1,289.3 1,340.9 17.3 1.3 –34.3 –2.6
Unemployment ('000) 506.6 505.9 508.8 0.7 0.1 –2.2 –0.4
Unemployment Rate (%) 6.8 6.8 6.9 0.0 –0.1
Participation Rate (%) 65.3 65.2 65.3 0.1 0.0
Employment Rate (%) 60.9 60.8 60.8 0.1 0.1

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey – CANSIM Table 282–0087

Ontario Quarterly employment and unemployment rate
Ontario quarterly employment and unemployment rate. The data table for this graph is located below
Show data table Ontario Quarterly employment and unemployment rate
Ontario Quarterly Employment and Unemployment Rate
Unemployment rate (%) Employment ('000)
1Q2010 9.0 6,477.5
2Q2010 8.6 6,540.8
3Q2010 8.9 6,556.0
4Q2010 8.2 6,578.3
1Q2011 8.0 6,628.6
2Q2011 8.0 6,662.0
3Q2011 7.7 6,674.4
4Q2011 7.9 6,667.5
1Q2012 7.8 6,673.9
2Q2012 7.9 6,693.3
3Q2012 7.9 6,707.4
4Q2012 8.1 6,740.6
1Q2013 7.8 6,781.1
2Q2013 7.6 6,815.2
3Q2013 7.5 6,843.3
4Q2013 7.5 6,850.4
1Q2014 7.4 6,859.1
2Q2014 7.3 6,866.1
3Q2014 7.3 6,880.3
4Q2014 6.9 6,904.1
1Q2015 6.9 6,896.4
2Q2015 6.6 6,919.3
3Q2015 6.7 6,931.8
4Q2015 6.8 6,946.9
1Q2016 6.8 6,983.1

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey

Ontario Quarterly Employment Growth
Ontario Quarterly Employment Growth
Show data table Ontario Quarterly Employment Growth
Ontario Quarterly Employment Growth
Ontario (%) Canada (%)
1Q2010 0.3 0.5
2Q2010 1.0 0.7
3Q2010 0.2 0.2
4Q2010 0.3 0.3
1Q2011 0.8 0.5
2Q2011 0.5 0.3
3Q2011 0.2 0.4
4Q2011 –0.1 0.0
1Q2012 0.1 0.1
2Q2012 0.3 0.9
3Q2012 0.2 0.2
4Q2012 0.5 0.5
1Q2013 0.6 0.3
2Q2013 0.5 0.3
3Q2013 0.4 0.2
4Q2013 0.1 0.2
1Q2014 0.1 0.1
2Q2014 0.1 0.0
3Q2014 0.2 0.2
4Q2014 0.3 0.4
1Q2015 –0.1 0.2
2Q2015 0.3 0.2
3Q2015 0.2 0.2
4Q2015 0.2 0.2
1Q2016 0.5 0.1

Source :Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey

Ontario Quarterly Unemployment Rates, by Gender and Age
Seasonally Adjusted Data 1st Quarter 2016 (%) 4th Quarter 2015 (%) 1st Quarter2015 (%) Quarterly Variation (% points) Yearly Variation (% points)
Total 6.8 6.8 6.9 0.0 –0.1
25 years and over 5.5 5.5 5.4 0.0 0.1
Men — 25 years and over 5.7 5.6 5.6 0.1 0.1
Women — 25 years and over 5.3 5.5 5.2 –0.2 0.1
15 to 24 years 14.2 14.1 15.0 0.1 –0.8
Men — 15 to 24 years 15.5 15.8 16.6 –0.3 –1.1
Women — 15 to 24 years 13.0 12.4 13.4 0.6 –0.4

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey — CANSIM Table 282–0087

Ontario Labour Market Indicators for Indigenous People
Seasonally Unadjusted Data 1st Quarter 2016 1st Quarter 2015 Yearly Variation
Indigenous Non–Indigenous Indigenous Number %
Population 15 + ('000) 229.6 11,236.6 222.1 7.5 3.4%
Labour Force ('000) 131.9 7,246.4 138.9 –7.0 –5.0%
Employment ('000) 116.1 6,749.7 121.5 –5.4 –4.4%
Full-Time ('000) 83.9 5,425.5 92.6 –8.7 –9.4%
Part-Time ('000) 32.3 1,324.2 28.9 3.4 11.8%
Unemployment ('000) 15.8 496.7 17.5 –1.7 –9.7%
Unemployment Rate (%) 12.0 6.9 12.6 –0.6
Participation Rate (%) 57.4 64.5 62.6 –5.2
Employment Rate (%) 50.6 60.1 54.7 –4.1

Notes: The Labour Force Survey excludes those living on–reserve

Estimates are based on three–month moving averages

Totals may not add due to rounding

Totals may be different from other tables due to adjustments done to Indigenous statistics in the Labour Force Survey

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey — ESDC custom table

Employment by Industry

Employment in the goods–producing sector grew for the fourth consecutive quarter

Employment in the goods–producing sector grew by 18,200 in the first quarter of 2016. Manufacturing led the sector with gains of 7,400 followed by agriculture (+5,700) and construction (+4,600). Forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas was the only industry to see a decline (–2,600), likely due to lower commodity demand and prices affecting the profitability of companies in the industry.

Manufacturing employment has been solid, rising in three of the past four quarters. Various indicators supported the recent strength. Provincial manufacturing sales in January 2016 posted a 3.9% gain from December 2015 and a 12.1% gain from January 2015, with February expected to show yet another increase. The growth in sales was widespread across most of the manufacturing sub–industries. Footnote5 In particular, new vehicle sales remained strong as first quarter results were up nearly 10.0% year–over–year. Footnote6 The RBC Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI), an indicator of business conditions in manufacturing, also signalled a stronger climate. The Index came in at 58.6 for the province in March, clearly in expansion territory. Ontario remained Canada’s top performer in terms of output and new orders, building on past strength. New export orders in the province reached its highest level since 2011, which may bode well for future manufacturing sales. Footnote7 The exchange rate depreciation against the U.S. dollar was likely the key contributor towards growing shipments. Manufacturers such as Simcoe Parts Service Inc., Footnote8 Mitsui High–tec, Inc. Footnote9 Huawei Technologies Canada Co., Ltd., Footnote10 and Magna International Inc. Footnote11 have all opted to expand operations recently to benefit from this favourable environment.

Agriculture surprised to the upside posting the largest quarterly gain seen in the industry since the first quarter of 2011. This was likely a result of a milder winter, particularity in southern Ontario. The weather also positively affected construction employment. The warmer temperatures likely allowed more projects to continue undisturbed throughout the quarter and allowed some projects to start earlier than planned. The quarterly construction employment gain was supported by strong housing starts in the first quarter of 2016, especially in urban centres, Footnote12 and various infrastructure projects such as hospital upgrades Footnote13 and transit projects in Mississauga, Footnote14 Waterloo, Footnote15 and Toronto. Footnote16

On a year–over–year basis, employment in the goods–producing sector rose by 42,900 with only the utilities industry (–3,600) moving lower. Employment in all of the other industries showed yearly increases with the most notable in manufacturing and constructing gaining 22,900 and 15,400, respectively.

The services–producing sector also grew for the fourth consecutive quarter

Employment in the services–producing sector grew by 18,000 in the first quarter of 2016. Increases came mainly from the professional, scientific and technical services (+7,000), accommodation and food services (+6,800), and health care and social assistance (+6,700) industries. However, employment growth was largely offset by losses in other services (–13,300), public administration (–2,100), and information, culture and recreation (–1,200).

The trade industry experienced a quarterly employment increase of 5,000, only the second gain for the industry in the past six quarters. While sales in wholesale trade were down as of January 2016, Footnote17 retail sales came in higher than expected with much of the gains coming from motor vehicle and parts dealers, and building supply retailers. Footnote18 Retail employment got a boost with IKEA Canada’s expansion, Footnote19 Lowe’s Canadian expansion following its buyout of Rona, Footnote20 and the influx of several luxury retailers. Footnote21

The employment decline in the information, culture and recreation industry was the fourth loss in the past five quarters. The industry is feeling the effects of shifts in consumer behaviour, especially in the print media segment. Print media continues to struggle with declining newspaper sales and the rise of online content. Further, the growing trend of more Canadians ‘cable cord–cutting’ in favour of alternatives such as Internet streaming and downloading, has affected television media providers. Footnote22 These trends have weighed down on media companies as seen by job cuts at Rogers Communications Footnote23and Torstar Corporation. Footnote24

Between the first quarters of 2015 and 2016, employment in the services–producing sector increased by a healthy 43,600 led by professional, scientific and technical services (+26,700), finance, insurance, real estate and leasing (+26,200), and health care and social assistance (+18,100). Declines took place in the trade (–14,600), educational services (–9,700), and information, culture and recreation (–9,300) industries.

Ontario Quarterly Labour Force Statistics, by Industry
Seasonally Adjusted Data ('000) 1st Quarter
2016
4th Quarter
2015
1st Quarter
2015
Quarterly Variation Yearly Variation
Number % Number %
Total employed, all industries 6,983.1 6,946.9 6,896.4 36.2 0.5 86.7 1.3
Goods–producing sector 1,428.2 1,410.0 1,385.3 18.2 1.3 42.9 3.1
Agriculture 83.0 77.3 77.9 5.7 7.4 5.1 6.5
Forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas 41.3 43.9 38.1 –2.6 –5.9 3.2 8.4
Utilities 48.1 44.9 51.7 3.2 7.1 –3.6 –7.0
Construction 498.0 493.4 482.6 4.6 0.9 15.4 3.2
Manufacturing 757.9 750.5 735.0 7.4 1.0 22.9 3.1
Services-producing sector 5,554.8 5,536.8 5,511.2 18.0 0.3 43.6 0.8
Trade 1,036.1 1,031.1 1,050.7 5.0 0.5 –14.6 –1.4
Transportation and warehousing 328.3 327.9 316.5 0.4 0.1 11.8 3.7
Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 553.4 553.9 527.2 –0.5 –0.1 26.2 5.0
Professional, scientific and technical services 597.0 590.0 570.3 7.0 1.2 26.7 7.9
Business, building and other support services 334.9 330.9 337.1 4.0 1.2 –2.2 –0.4
Educational services 509.5 504.4 519.2 5.1 1.0 –9.7 –1.2
Health care and social assistance 828.4 821.7 810.3 6.7 0.8 18.1 5.8
Information, culture and recreation 302.9 304.1 312.2 –1.2 –0.4 –9.3 –2.1
Accommodation and food services 450.0 443.2 446.0 6.8 1.5 4.0 1.5
Other services 269.4 282.7 271.7 –13.3 –4.7 –2.3 –0.7
Public administration 344.8 346.9 350.0 –2.1 –0.6 –5.2 –1.5

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey – CANSIM Table 282–0088

Regional Analysis

Toronto continued to lead the province in employment growth

Employment in the Toronto economic region rose by 108,400 between the first quarters of 2015 and 2016 (measured on a year–over–year, seasonally unadjusted basis). All of the gains were in full–time positions, and the regional unemployment rate inched down to 7.0%. Strong growth took place in the construction industry. Ground broke on the $5.3B Eglinton Crosstown Light Rail Transit (LRT) project, which is expected to employ approximately 2,500 workers at the peak of construction. Footnote25 Other major announcements included a $50M investment towards an entertainment venue adjacent to the Woodbine Racetrack, Footnote26 and the start of the City Centre Transit Terminal Restoration project in Mississauga. Footnote27 Despite stronger growth figures posted in other industries, educational services did not fare as well. The Toronto District School Board announced that it would cut 102 teachers, 45 early childhood educators, and 46 lunchroom supervisors in the fall as enrolment declines. Footnote28 However, the Halton District School Board will hire 35 educational assistants to provide support for students with special needs. Footnote29

Employment grew for the second consecutive quarter in the Kitchener–Waterloo–Barrie economic region. Employment increased by 11,100 and the regional unemployment rate rose from 5.7% to 6.0% as more people looked for work. The goods–producing sector accounted for all of the gains in the region, while the services–producing sector experienced a modest loss. Within the goods–producing sector, there was a fair amount of activity in the local manufacturing industry this quarter. The Government of Ontario will invest up to $15M in Waterloo’s Sandvine Incorporated ULC to support the development of networking equipment technologies, which will help create 75 jobs and retain 267 existing positions. Footnote30 This is a positive announcement for Waterloo’s technology hub, as it continues to feel the effects of restructuring efforts at BlackBerry Limited. The company revealed that it would lay off 200 employees between its Waterloo headquarters and its manufacturing facility in Florida in early February. Footnote31

Between the first quarters of 2015 and 2016, employment also increased in the Hamilton–Niagara Peninsula, London, Northwest, and Ottawa economic regions.

Employment losses registered across five economic regions

Employment fell by 23,600 in the Muskoka–Kawarthas economic region in the first quarter of 2016. The regional labour market continued to struggle with employment losses reported in both full–time and part–time work, and a lower labour force participation rate. There were several layoff announcements made in the first quarter. Metro Inc. closed its grocery store in Bracebridge in early March and will replace it with a Food Basics location. Footnote32 Postmedia Network Canada Corp. ceased publication of What’s Up Muskoka and Muskoka Magazine, affecting 11 full–time and 15 part–time employees. Footnote33 Lastly, the Northumberland Hills Hospital announced that it would be restructuring, affecting up to 17 full–time and three part–time registered nurses, as well as eight nurses that are currently in job–share positions. Footnote34

The Windsor–Sarnia and Stratford–Bruce Peninsula economic regions also saw employment declines between the first quarters of 2015 and 2016. Even with employment losses in the region, the manufacturing industry in Windsor–Sarnia received a boost with hiring at FCA Canada Inc.’s Windsor Assembly Plant. The company announced in February that it is in the midst of adding 1,200 workers to help produce the new Chrysler Pacifica minivan in Windsor. Footnote35 Recruitment also began at Magna International Inc.’s Integram Seating plant in Tecumseh, Footnote36 and at Highbury Canco Corporation’s facility in Leamington. Footnote37 In the Stratford–Bruce Peninsula region, Compass Minerals announced that it would lay off 150 staff due to the milder winter weather. It is unknown at this time how many workers will be affected at the Goderich salt mine. Footnote38

Employment declines were also recorded in the Northeast and Kingston–Pembroke economic regions.

Ontario Quarterly Labour Force Statistics, by Economic Region
Seasonally Unadjusted Data Employment Unemployment Rate
1st Quarter
2016
('000)
1st Quarter
2015
('000)
Yearly
Variation
(%)
1st Quarter
2016
(%)
1st Quarter 2015
(%)
Yearly Variation
(% points)
Ontario 6,872.4 6,783.7 1.3 6.9 7.1 –0.2
Economic Regions
Ottawa 680.8 680.3 0.1 7.1 7.1 0.0
Kingston—Pembroke 198.5 199.6 –0.6 7.7 8.6 –0.9
Muskoka—Kawarthas 163.4 187.0 –12.6 5.6 8.6 –3.0
Toronto 3,320.6 3,212.2 3.4 7.0 7.1 –0.1
Kitchener—Waterloo—Barrie 709.4 698.3 1.6 6.0 5.7 0.3
Hamilton—Niagara Peninsula 704.8 695.0 1.4 7.0 6.3 0.7
London 326.0 317.6 2.6 6.2 6.6 –0.4
Windsor—Sarnia 288.5 298.6 –3.4 7.4 9.4 –2.0
Stratford—Bruce Peninsula 142.1 152.2 –6.6 6.3 5.9 0.4
Northeast 239.1 247.1 –3.2 8.1 8.1 0.0
Northwest 99.2 95.8 3.5 7.9 5.8 2.1

Note: Totals may not add due to rounding

Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey – CANSIM Table 282–0122

Ontario Quarterly Employment Growth, by Economic Region Q1–2015 to Q1–2016
Ontario Quarterly Employment Growth, by Economic Region Q3-2014 to Q3-2015
Show data table Ontario Quarterly Employment Growth, by Economic Region Q1–2015 to Q1–2016
Ontario Quarterly Employment Growth, by Economic Region
Muskoka—Kawarthas –12.6
Stratford—Bruce Peninsula –6.6
Windsor—Sarnia –3.4
Northeast –3.2
Kingston—Pembroke –0.6
Ottawa 0.1
Hamilton—Niagara Peninsula 1.4
Kitchener—Waterloo—Barrie 1.6
London 2.6
Toronto 3.4
Northwest 3.5

Source :Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey

Note In preparing this document, the authors have taken care to provide clients with labour market information that is timely and accurate at the time of publication. Since labour market conditions are dynamic, some of the information presented here may have changed since this document was published. Users are encouraged to also refer to other sources for additional information on the local economy and labour market. Information contained in this document does not necessarily reflect official policies of Employment and Social Development Canada.

Prepared by: Labour Market Information (LMI) Division, Ontario.

For further information, please contact the LMI team at: NC-LMI-IMT-GD@hrsdc–rhdcc.gc.ca

For information on the Labour Force Survey, please visit the Statistics Canada Web site at: www.statcan.gc.ca

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Cahill, K. (2016, April 05). March 2016 Non-Manufacturing ISM Report On Business. Institute for Supply Management. Retrieved from https://www.instituteforsupplymanagement.org/ismreport/nonmfgrob.cfm

Return to footnote 1

Footnote 2

Dow Jones Business News. (2016, April 01). U.S. March Nonfarm Payrolls Rise by 215,000; Jobless Rate 5.0%. Nasdaq. Retrieved from http://www.nasdaq.com/article/us–march–nonfarm–payrolls–rise–by–215000–jobless–rate–50–20160401–00302

Return to footnote 2

Footnote 3

Kloet, J. (2016, March 24). Lambton College partners with Chippewas of Kettle and Stony Point First Nation to launch a satellite location of The Cube. Lambton College. Retrieved from http://www.lambtoncollege.ca/custom/Pages/News/Article.aspx?id=2147512573

Return to footnote 3

Footnote 4

Myers, E. (2016, March 30). Education agreement ends with jobs for First Nations students. Northern Ontario Business. Retrieved from http://www.northernontariobusiness.com/Industry–News/education/2016/04/Education–agreement–ends–with–jobs–for–First–Nations–students.aspx

Return to footnote 4

Footnote 5

Statistics Canada. Table304-0015 — Manufacturing sales, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and province, monthly (dollars),CANSIM (database).(accessed:2016–04–08)

Return to footnote 5

Footnote 6

DesRosiers Automotive Consultants Inc. (2016, April 01). Total Light Vehicles in Canada – March 2016 Report. DesRosiers Automotive Consultants Inc. Retrieved from http://www.desrosiers.ca/pdfs/sales.pdf

Return to footnote 6

Footnote 7

Lalonde, E. (2016, April 01). RBC Canadian Manufacturing PMI™ Report. RBC. Retrieved from www.rbc.com/newsroom/news/2016/20160401–pmi.html

Return to footnote 7

Footnote 8

Pritchard, B. (2016, March 29). Auto parts manufacturer brings new jobs to Alliston. Alliston Herald. Retrieved from http://www.simcoe.com/news–story/6409853–auto–parts–manufacturer–bringing–new–jobs–to–alliston/

Return to footnote 8

Footnote 9

Government of Ontario. (2016, March 21). Ontario invests in Mitsui High-tec’s first North American plant. Ontario Newsroom. Retrieved from https://news.ontario.ca/medt/en/2016/03/ontario–invests–in–new–electric–and–hybrid–vehicle–parts–manufacturing.html

Return to footnote 9

Footnote 10

\CNGRP. (2016, March 09). Huawei to expand research and operations. Ontario Construction Report. Retrieved from http://ontarioconstructionreport.com/huawei–to–expand–operations–in–ottawa–and–expand–research–in–markham–and–waterloo–with–210–million–investment/

Return to footnote 10

Footnote 11

Wilhelm, T. (2016, March 03). Magna’s Integram is hiring. Windsor Star. Retrieved from http://windsorstar.com/news/local–news/integram–seating–is–hiring

Return to footnote 11

Footnote 12

Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation. (2016, April 08). Preliminary Housing Start Data. Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation. Retrieved from http://www.cmhc–schl.gc.ca/odpub/esub/64695/64695_2016_M04.pdf?fr=1460126401130

Return to footnote 12

Footnote 13

Government of Ontario. (2016, March 31). Ontario invests in hospital infrastructure. Ontario Newsroom. Retrieved from https://news.ontario.ca/mohltc/en/2016/03/ontario–investing–12–billion–to–build–new–and–improved–hospitals.html

Return to footnote 13

Footnote 14

City of Mississauga. (2016, March). City Centre Transit Terminal Restoration. City of Mississauga. Retrieved from http://www.mississauga.ca/portal/miway/ccttconstruction

Return to footnote 14

Footnote 15

MacDonald, C. (2016, February 02). Lengthy LRT work to start Monday in Uptown Waterloo. 570 News. Retrieved from http://www.570news.com/2016/02/02/lengthy–lrt–work–to–start–monday–in–uptown–waterloo/

Return to footnote 15

Footnote 16

CityNews Staff. (2016, March 10). Construction begins on first Eglinton Crosstown LRT station. CityNews. Retrieved from http://www.citynews.ca/2016/03/10/construction–begins–on–first–eglinton–crosstown–lrt–station/

Return to footnote 16

Footnote 17

Statistics Canada. Table 081–0011 — Wholesale trade, sales by the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), monthly (dollars), CANSIM (database).(accessed:2016–04–08)

Return to footnote 17

Footnote 18

Statistics Canada. Table 080–0020 — Retail trade, sales by the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), monthly (dollars), CANSIM (database).(accessed:2016–04–08)

Return to footnote 18

Footnote 19

CNW. (2016, March 21). IKEA Continues to Expand Operations in Canada. CNW Group Ltd. Retrieved from http://www.newswire.ca/news–releases/ikea–continues–to–expand–operations–in–canada–572930061.html

Return to footnote 19

Footnote 20

Kupon, F. (2016, February 03). Lowe’s Rona deal faces Quebec opposition. Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/business/2016/02/03/lowes–to–buy–rona–for–32b.html

Return to footnote 20

Footnote 21

Retail Insider. (2016, March 09). Links of London to open 2 Canadian locations this spring. Retail Insider. Retrieved from http://www.retail–insider.com/retail–insider/2016/3/links

Return to footnote 21

Footnote 22

Harris, S. (2016, April 06). Cable cord–cutting numbers soar in Canada. CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cable–costs–cord–cutting–canada–netflix–1.3525949

Return to footnote 22

Footnote 23

The Canadian Press. (2016, January 25). Rogers to cut 200 media and admin jobs. Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/business/2016/01/25/rogers–to–cut–200–media–and–admin–jobs.html

Return to footnote 23

Footnote 24

Bradshaw, J. (2016, January 15). Toronto Star closes printing plant, cuts newsroom head count. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report–on–business/toronto–star–confirms–closure–of–vaughan–plant–285–jobs–affected/article28210116/

Return to footnote 24

Footnote 25

Office of the Premier. (2016, March 10). Ontario Breaks Ground on First Eglinton Crosstown LRT Station. Ontario.ca. Retrieved from https://news.ontario.ca/opo/en/2016/03/ontario–breaks–ground–on–first–eglinton–crosstown–lrt–station.html

Return to footnote 25

Footnote 26

CityNews Staff. (2016, February 16). Woodbine Racetrack announces $50 million expansion plan. CityNews. Retrieved from http://www.citynews.ca/2016/02/16/woodbine–racetrack–announces–huge–expansion–plan/

Return to footnote 26

Footnote 27

Newport, A. (2016, March 20). Construction Coming to Square One Transit Terminal. Insauga. Retrieved from http://www.insauga.com/construction–coming–to–square–one–transit–terminal

Return to footnote 27

Footnote 28

Rushowy, K. (2016, March 09). TDSB approves cutting teacher jobs as enrolment dips. Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/yourtoronto/education/2016/03/09/tdsb–approves–cutting–teacher–jobs–as–enrolment–dips.html

Return to footnote 28

Footnote 29

Whitnell, T. (2016, February 01). Halton public school board hiring 35 more educational assistants. Burlington Post. Retrieved from http://www.insidehalton.com/news–story/6239200–halton–public–school–board–hiring–35–more–educational–assistants/

Return to footnote 29

Footnote 30

Office of the Premier. (2016, March 16). Ontario Partners With Next-Generation Tech Leader. Ontario.ca. Retrieved from https://news.ontario.ca/opo/en/2016/03/ontario–partners–with–next–generation–tech–leader.html

Return to footnote 30

Footnote 31

Dingman, S. (2016, February 06). BlackBerry cuts 200 jobs in Canada, U.S. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/technology/blackberry–to–cut–75–jobs–in–florida/article28599787/

Return to footnote 31

Footnote 32

Hartill, M. (2016, January 08). Metro Bracebridge location confirmed closing. Bracebridge Examiner. Retrieved from http://www.muskokaregion.com/news–story/6224230–metro–bracebridge–location–confirmed–closing/

Return to footnote 32

Footnote 33

Bradshaw, J. (2016, January 07). Postmedia shuts down Muskoka publications citing financial losses, low readership. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/postmedia-shuts-down-muskoka-publications-citing-financial-losses-low-readership/article28063390/

Return to footnote 33

Footnote 34

MacDonald, V. (2016, January 25). ONA expects 28 nurses to be affected at Northumberland Hills Hospital. Northumberland Today. Retrieved from http://www.northumberlandtoday.com/2016/01/25/ona-expects-28-nurses-to-be-affected-at-northumberland-hills-hospital

Return to footnote 34

Footnote 35

CBC News. (2016, February 11). Windsor Assembly Plant to hire 1,200 new workers, FCA CEO says. CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/fiat-chrysler-windsor-assembly-plant-1.3444443

Return to footnote 35

Footnote 36

Wilhelm, T. (2016, March 03). Integram Seating is hiring. Windsor Star. Retrieved from http://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/integram-seating-is-hiring

Return to footnote 36

Footnote 37

Schmidt, D. (2016, January 15). Leamington's Highbury Canco, expanding again, seeks 85 new workers. Windsor Star. Retrieved from http://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/leamingtons-highbury-canco-expanding-again-seeks-85-new-workers

Return to footnote 37

Footnote 38

Broadley, L. (2016, February 17). More layoffs to come at Compass Minerals. Goderich Signal Star. Retrieved from http://www.goderichsignalstar.com/2016/02/17/more-layoffs-to-come-at-compass-minerals

Return to footnote 38

Date modified: